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Author Topic: Autoradiography on tissue sections  (Read 18152 times)

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Offline Cardio

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Re: Autoradiography on tissue sections
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2011, 01:59:46 PM »
As for the half life of emulsion it may very well depend on where you get it from. I believe there is only one supplier for fine grade emulsion in the U.S. and I know that emulsion will last at least 6 months to a year.

Another question...what is your preferred emulsion? I have seen Amershams (which has been discontinued) and then Ilford and Kodak. Do you think one is better than the other? or is there another one available?
So after talking to more people I would highly suggest you contact Ilford and find out which emulsion to purchase. No all emuslion will react with TH3 the same way. For instance finer grain emulsion (smaller particles) used for EM or such things could need longer incubation times than course grain emulison.


The Company should point you in the right direction so you don't waste money and time.

Re: Autoradiography on tissue sections
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2011, 01:59:46 PM »

Offline funk.106

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Re: Autoradiography on tissue sections
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2011, 10:44:41 AM »
One thing that I am confused about is why you used TH3 labeled compound. Why not label it with a Flag or HA unless of course those are too big. ALso one advantage you can have with using emulsion is that you will be able to use Hoescht or Dapi plus antibodies with the emulsion. The background flouresence increases but its not too bad with hoescht.

Asside from the size issue, essentially we need the low concentration of compound permitted by radioactivity. We're wanting to prove specificity of a compound for one protein over another, but we know that that specificity is lost with high concentrations of compound. Also this project is in the realm of PET imaging drug discovery, so while 3H isn't the radioisotope that would be used, the radioactivity is relevant---and also less complicated for other aspects of the project, the tissue labeling is really only a small part of the larger project. Thank you for the tips though, I think I will take your advice and talk to the companies and see what they have to say--just thought I'd see what kind of impression people had of the different options.

Re: Autoradiography on tissue sections
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2011, 10:44:41 AM »