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Author Topic: Life Sciences Employment Overview study  (Read 4706 times)

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Offline t.zemlo

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Life Sciences Employment Overview study
« on: March 17, 2004, 11:51:47 AM »
The Science Advisory Board has just released the, “Employment Overview Survey of the Life Sciences: A Window into the SAB Member’s Workplace,” which is a frank assessment of the different elements that constitute life science careers based upon both qualitative and quantitative data.

These data were collected from the responses to an online questionnaire fielded by nearly 1,700 individuals employed in various sectors of the life sciences. Two-thirds of the respondents were male and one-third of the respondents were female ranging in age from just 21 years old to greater than 65 years old. However, the majority of participants were between 31 to 50 years old.

The Science Advisory Board was interested in determining how well these life science professionals’ jobs relate to their education, training, and professional experiences. Members of the Board were asked to share their opinions as to what fundamentals are necessary to succeed in the life sciences workplace.

Along with these insights, the study also examined job-related responsibilities and their effects on job satisfaction and frustration levels. In addition to getting a feel for such intangibles as recognition and appreciation, the study explored more concrete measures of work-place contentment such as compensation, benefits, and access to resources.

The following report is therefore more than just a salary survey or a compendium of likes and dislikes about research and clinical jobs, it is a guide for evaluating employment in the life sciences.

The report is freely available at http://www.scienceboard.net/pdf/scienceboard.net_jobsurvey.pdf
amara Zemlo, Ph.D., MPH
Director, The Science Advisory Board
http://www.scienceboard.net

Life Sciences Employment Overview study
« on: March 17, 2004, 11:51:47 AM »